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Toys

Kids Learning October 28, 2013

Toys

Its time for toys. Kids all time favorite toys are being manufactured by popular toy makers. Toys for little boys are somewhat different from the little girls toys. Hot toys are fun to play with and they are always ready to entertain kids with their uniqueness. Lets find out such toys. Fisher-Price T.M.X. Elmo, Cookie […]

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Footwear Facts

Kids Learning October 28, 2013

Footwear Facts

Sandals originated in warm climates where the soles of the feet needed protection but the top of the foot needed to be cool.

4,000 years ago the first shoes were made of a single piece of rawhide that enveloped the foot for both warmth and protection.

In Europe pointed toes on shoes were fashionable from the eleventh to the fifteenth centuries.

In the Middle East heels were added to shoes to lift the foot from the burning sand.

In Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries heels on shoes were always colored red.
Shoes all over the world were identical until the nineteenth century, when left- and right-footed shoes were first made in Philadelphia.

In Europe it wasn’t until the eighteenth century that women’s shoes were different from men’s.

Six-inch-high heels were worn by the upper classes in seventeenth-century Europe. Two servants, one on either side, were needed to hold up the person wearing the high heels.

Sneakers were first made in America in 1916. They were originally called keds.

Boots were first worn in cold, mountainous regions and hot, sandy deserts where horse-riding communities lived. Heels on boots kept feet secure in the stirrups.

The first lady’s boot was designed for Queen Victoria in 1840.

Sneakers were first made in America in 1916. They were originally called keds.
Boots were first worn in cold, mountainous regions and hot, sandy deserts where horse-riding communities lived. Heels on boots kept feet secure in the stirrups.
The first lady’s boot was designed for Queen Victoria in 1840.

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Amazing Language

Kids Learning October 18, 2013

Amazing Language

There are more than 2,700 languages in the world. In addition, there are more than 7,000 dialects.
A dialect is a regional variety of a language that has a different pronunciation, vocabulary, or meaning.

The most difficult language to learn is Basque, which is spoken in northwestern Spain and southwestern France. It is not related to any other language in the world. It has an extremely complicated word structure and vocabulary.

All pilots on international flights identify themselves in English.

Somalia is the only African country in which the entire population speaks the same language, Somali.

The language in which a government conducts business is the official language of that country.

More than 1,000 different languages are spoken on the continent of Africa.
Many languages in Africa include a \”click\” sound that is pronounced at the same time as other sounds. You must learn these languages in childhood to do it properly.

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Name of Months

Kids Learning October 18, 2013

Months

Months are based roughly on the moon. A lunar month is 291/2 days, or the time from one new moon to the next. 12 lunar months leave 11 days remaining in the solar year.
To help you remember the days of the month, remember 30 days has September, April, June, and November. All the rest have 31, except February, which has 28.

The Names of the Months

January: named after Janus, protector of the gateway to heaven
February: named after Februalia, a time period when sacrifices were made to atone for sins
March: named after Mars, the god of war, presumably signifying that the campaigns interrupted by the winter could be resumed
April: from Aperire, Latin for to open (buds)
May: named after Maia, the goddess of growth of plants
June: from Junius, Latin for the goddess Juno
July: named after Julius Caesar
August: named after Augustus, the first Roman Emperor
September: from Septem, Latin for seven
October: from Octo, Latin for eight
November: from Novem, Latin for nine
December: from Decem, Latin for ten

NOTE: The earliest Latin calendar was a 10-month one; thus September was the seventh month, October, the eighth, etc. July was originally called Quintilis, as the fifth month; August was originally called Sextilis, as the sixth month

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What is Deforestation

Kids Learning October 18, 2013

Deforestation is the conversion of forested areas to non-forest land use such as arable land, pasture, urban use, logged area or wasteland. Generally the removal or destruction of significant areas of forest cover has resulted in a degraded environment with reduced biodiversity. In many countries, massive deforestation is ongoing and is shaping climate and geography.
Jungle burned for agriculture in southern Mexico.

While tropical rainforest deforestation has attracted most attention, tropical dry forests are being lost at a substantially higher rate, primarily as an outcome of slash-and-burn techniques used by shifting cultivators. Generally loss of biodiversity is highly correlated with deforestation.

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Mickey Mouse

Kids Learning October 18, 2013

Mickey Mouse

Mickey Mouse – the one mouse anyone would love to have scurrying about their house, is undoubtedly the most popular cartoon character to date. Did you know that the creation of Mickey Mouse is what made Walt Disney so successful?

When Walt was 26 years old, he was returning home by train with his wife. Walt was a sad man, because his cartoons were not selling, and he was not making any money. He was returning to his little studio, and wanted to come back with something for his staff. As he was wondering what to draw, he came upon the idea of a mouse. Even though most people were scared of mice, they still look so vulnerable and sympathetic, that it’s easy to grow fond of them. So Mr. and Mrs. Disney started picturing what their mouse would look like: Big ears, red velvet pants – and a smart little fellow. And what should they name him? “Mortimer!” declared Walt. But just when the train pulled into the station, Mrs. Disney pulled her husband’s sleeve and said, “Mortimer? No. I’d say Mickey. Mickey Mouse.”

At first Walt had a tough time convincing selling his cartoon. He went from studio to studio, director to director, but all his scripts were rejected. Then finally, one manager at a small theatre, took a liking to Walt and his determination, and agreed to screen the film. The cartoon did phenomenally well. It smashed all records and created a sensation in the filming world. Disney was suddenly much in demand, and everyone wanted more of Mickey. So Mickey’s friends were born: Minne Mouse, Donald Duck, Goofy, Pluto. And the rest, as they say, is history.

And so kids, remember the words of Walt Disney himself if you ever visit one of the fantastic Disneyworld parks. “All this was started by a mouse.”

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The Olympic Games

Kids Learning October 16, 2013

The Olympic Games Summary

The first Olympic Games of which there is record were held in 776 B.C., and consisted of one event, a great foot race of about 200 yards held on a plain by the River Alpheus (now the Ruphia) just outside the little town of Olympia in Greece. It was from that date the Greeks began to keep their calendar by \”Olympiads,\” the four-year spans between the celebrations of the famous games.

The modern Olympic Games, which started in Athens in 1896, are the result of the devotion of a French educator, Baron Pierre de Coubertin, to the idea that, since young people and athletics have gone together through the ages, education and athletics might go hand-in-hand toward a better international understanding.

The principal organization responsible for the staging of the Games is the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Other important roles are played by the National Olympic Committees in each participating country, international sports federations, and the organizing committee of the host city.

The Olympic motto is \”Citius, Altius, Fortius\”—\”Faster, Higher, Stronger.\” The Olympic symbol is five interlocking circles colored blue, yellow, black, green, and red, on a white background, representing the five continents. At least one of those colors appears in the national flag of every country.

Beginning in 1994, the IOC decided to change the format of having both the Summer and Winter Games in the same year. Summer and Winter Olympics now alternate every two years.

In Feb. 1998 the IOC announced that new sports added to the games must include women’s events.

At the 2005 Singapore meeting the IOC decided to eliminate baseball and softball from the 2012 Olympics, the first sports to be dropped since polo in 1936.

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Questions About Moon

Kids Learning October 16, 2013

Questions and Answers

Q. If you weighed 100 pounds (45 kilograms) on Earth, how much would you weigh on the Moon?
A. 16½ pounds (7½ kilograms).

Q. If you can jump 3 feet high (92 centimeters) on the arth, how high could you jump on the Moon?
A. Just over 18 feet (about 5½ meters).

Q. How many times heavier is the Earth than the Moon?
A. 81 times.

Q. How many Moons would fit inside the Earth?
A. 49.

Q. How fast does the Moon travel in its path around the Earth?
A. 2,287 miles per hour (3,680 kilometers per hour).

Q. Which is the largest crater on the Moon?
A. The crater Bailly. It is 183 miles (295 kilometers) across.

Q. How long does it take radio signals to travel from the Earth to the Moon?
A. About 1¼ seconds. (Radio signals move at the speed of light – about 186,000 miles per second.)

Q. How many spacecraft have landed or crashed on the Moon?
A. At least 37 – 24 from the United States and 14 from Russia.

Q. How much did al the Moon rocks brought back by the Apollo astronauts weigh?
A. 842 pounds (382 kilograms).

Q. Who was the last person to walk on the Moon?
A. Apollo 17 astronaut Eugene Cernan.

Q. Is there such a thing as a “moonquake”?
A. Yes. Instruments left on the Moon’s surface have recorded about 3,000 moonquakes per year.

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Some Type of Scientists

Kids Learning October 16, 2013

An agronomist specializes in soil and crops.
An astronomer studies stars, planets and galaxies.
A botanist specializes in plants.
A cytologist specializes in the study of cells.
An epidemiologist studies the spread of diseases.
An ethologist studies animal behavior.
A geneticist studies how traits are inherited.
A geologist specializes in the history of Earth.
A geographer studies Earth’s surface.
A marine biologist studies ocean plants and animals.
A meteorologist studies weather and climate.
A microbiologist studies microscopic plants and animals.
A paleontologist specializes in fossils.
A physicist studies matter, energy, and how they are related.
A seismologist studies earthquakes.

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Countries and Currency

Kids Learning October 16, 2013

Money Around the World

Would you like to pay for your purchase in camels or cocoa beans? Perhaps you’d like your change in shells. Throughout history, all kinds of things have been used as money. Precious metals have kept their popularity since they’re easy to handle (unlike camels) and keep their value. Here is how cold cash is measured around the world.

Country Currency
Australia dollar
Brazil real
China yuan
Czech Republic koruna
Denmark krone
Ethiopia birr
France euro (formerly French franc)
Germany euro (formerly Deutsche mark)
Ghana cedi
Greece Euro (formerly drachma)
Haiti gourde
India rupee
Israel shekel
Italy Euro (formerly lira)
Japan yen
Jordan dinar
Laos kip
Malaysia ringgit
Mexico peso
Mongolia tugrik
Morocco dirham
The Netherlands Euro (formerly guilder)
Peru nuevo sol
Poland zloty
Portugal Euro (formerly escudo)
Russia ruble
Saudi Arabia riyal
South Africa rand
South Korea won
Spain Euro (formerly peseta)
Sweden krona
Thailand baht
United Kingdom pound sterling
United States dollar
Venezuela bolivar
Zambia kwacha

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Science Discoveries

Kids Learning October 16, 2013

Try to imagine life without antibiotics. We would not live nearly as long as we do without them. Here\’s a look at some discoveries that have changed the world. It\’s impossible to rank their importance, so they are listed in the order they were discovered.

The Copernicum System
In 1543, while on his deathbed, Polish astronomer Nicholas Copernicus published his theory that the Sun is a motionless body at the center of the solar system, with the planets revolving around it. Before the Copernicum system was introduced, astronomers believed the Earth was at the center of the universe.

Gravity
Isaac Newton, an English mathematician and physicist, is considered the greatest scientist of all time. Among his many discoveries, the most important is probably his law of universal gravitation. In 1664, Newton figured out that gravity is the force that draws objects toward each other. It explained why things fall down and why the planets orbit around the Sun.

Electricity
If electricity makes life easier for us, you can thank Michael Faraday. He made two big discoveries that changed our lives. In 1821, he discovered that when a wire carrying an electric current is placed next to a single magnetic pole, the wire will rotate. This led to the development of the electric motor. Ten years later, he became the first person to produce an electric current by moving a wire through a magnetic field. Faraday’s experiment created the first generator, the forerunner of the huge generators that produce our electricity.

Evolution
When Charles Darwin, the British naturalist, came up with the theory of evolution in 1859, he changed our idea of how life on earth developed. Darwin argued that all organisms evolve, or change, very slowly over time. These changes are adaptations that allow a species to survive in its environment. These adaptations happen by chance. If a species doesn’t adapt, it may become extinct. He called this process natural selection, but it is often called the survival of the fittest.

Louis Pasteur
Before French chemist Louis Pasteur began experimenting with bacteria in the 1860s, people did not know what caused disease. He not only discovered that disease came from microorganisms, but he also realized that bacteria could be killed by heat and disinfectant. This idea caused doctors to wash their hands and sterilize their instruments, which has saved millions of lives.

Theory of Relativity
Albert Einstein\’s theory of special relativity, which he published in 1905, explains the relationships between speed, time and distance. The complicated theory states that the speed of light always remains the same—186,000 miles/second (300,000 km/second) regardless of how fast someone or something is moving toward or away from it. This theory became the foundation for much of modern science.

The Big Bang Theory
Nobody knows exactly how the universe came into existence, but many scientists believe that it happened about 13.7 billion years ago with a massive explosion, called the Big Bang. In 1927, Georges Lemaître proposed the Big Bang theory of the universe. The theory says that all the matter in the universe was originally compressed into a tiny dot. In a fraction of a second, the dot expanded, and all the matter instantly filled what is now our universe. The event marked the beginning of time. Scientific observations seem to confirm the theory.

Penicillin
Antibiotics are powerful drugs that kill dangerous bacteria in our bodies that make us sick. In 1928, Alexander Fleming discovered the first antibiotic, penicillin, which he grew in his lab using mold and fungi. Without antibiotics, infections like strep throat could be deadly.

DNA
On February 28, 1953, James Watson of the United States and Francis Crick of England made one of the greatest scientific discoveries in history. The two scientists found the double-helix structure of DNA. It\’s made up of two strands that twist around each other and have an almost endless variety of chemical patterns that create instructions for the human body to follow. Our genes are made of DNA and determine how things like what color hair and eyes we\’ll have. In 1962, they were awarded the Nobel Prize for this work. The discovery has helped doctors understand diseases and may someday prevent some illnesses like heart disease and cancer.

Periodic Table
The Periodic Table is based on the 1869 Periodic Law proposed by Russian chemist Dmitry Mendeleev. He had noticed that, when arranged by atomic weight, the chemical elements lined up to form groups with similar properties. He was able to use this to predict the existence of undiscovered elements and note errors in atomic weights. In 1913, Henry Moseley of England confirmed that the table could be made more accurate by arranging the elements by atomic number, which is the number of protons in an atom of the element.

X-Rays
Wilhelm Roentgen, a German physicist, discovered X-rays in 1895. X-rays go right through some substances, like flesh and wood, but are stopped by others, such as bones and lead. This allows them to be used to see broken bones or explosives inside suitcases, which makes them useful for doctors and security officers. For this discovery, Roentgen was awarded the first-ever Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901.

Quantum Theory
Danish physicist Niels Bohr is considered one of the most important figures in modern physics. He won a 1922 Nobel Prize in Physics for his research on the structure of an atom and for his work in the development of the quantum theory. Although he help develop the atomic bomb, he frequently promoted the use of atomic power for peaceful purposes.

Atomic Bomb
The legacy of the atomic bomb is mixed: it successfully put an end to World War II, but ushered in the nuclear arms race. Some of the greatest scientists of the time gathered in the early 1940s to figure out how to refine uranium and build an atomic bomb. Their work was called the Manhattan Project. In 1945, the U.S. dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Tens of thousands of civilians were instantly killed, and Japan surrendered. These remain the only two nuclear bombs ever used in battle. Several of the scientists who worked on the Manhattan Project later urged the government to use nuclear power for peaceful purposes only. Nevertheless, many countries continue to stockpile nuclear weapons. Some people say the massive devastation that could result from nuclear weapons actually prevents countries from using them.

HIV/AIDS
In 1983 and 1984, Luc Montagnier of France and Robert Gallo of the United States discovered the HIV virus and determined that it was the cause of AIDS. Scientists have since developed tests to determine if a person has HIV. People who test positive are urged to take precautions to prevent the spread of the disease. Drugs are available to keep HIV and AIDS under control. The hope is that further research will lead to the development of a cure.

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Apes and Human

Kids Learning October 16, 2013

The Relationship between Apes and Humans

Since scientists developed the ability to decode the genome and compare the genetic makeup of species, some people have been stunned to learn that about 98.5% of the genes in people and chimpanzees are identical. This finding means chimps are the closest living biological relatives to humans, but it does not mean that humans evolved from chimps. What it does indicate is that humans share a common ancestor with modern African apes (i.e., gorillas and chimpanzees), making us very, very distant cousins. We are therefore related to these other living primates, but we did not descend from them.

Modern humans differ from apes in many significant ways. Human brains are larger and more complex; people have elaborate forms of communication and culture; and people habitually walk upright, can manipulate very small objects, and can speak.

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Online Tutoring

Kids Learning October 14, 2013

Online Tutoring

Here is one more great advantage of ever growing Internet – Online Tutoring.
In such a busy life, where both the parents are working its quite difficult to pay as much attention to the kids as required. Online education is a giant advantage for those who cannot afford to reach out to the learning centers and campuses due to various constraints.
As per the recent survey about 60% of teenagers graduate from high school in United States. One solution parents have found to this problem is to hire a tutor that can help their children with their lessons. Private tutor can be rather expensive. This is where technology comes in.

Tutor vista is one such site that claims

Get one-on-one tutoring to excel in school or college and competitive exams! Our tutors have graduate degrees, undergo months of training and pass a stringent certification process before they become certified TutorVista tutors – and they are available 24×7.

Now with such technological advancements you can make sure that your child gets all the Home Work Help and much more from the professionals sitting in the comfort of your home.

Currently there are few special offers on the website, like

Special Offer! Get unlimited tutoring at $24.99 for the first month in all subjects!

The best par is that you can schedule tutoring and homework help sessions whenever you want them, as many times as you need them.

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Great Artists

Kids Learning October 14, 2013

Great Artists

A Few Great Artists

Leonardo Da Vinci (1452-1519) Italian Renaissance artist who was most famous as a painter but also excelled at drawing (particularly the human anatomy), architecture and sculpture. More than 500 years after it was painted, his Mona Lisa remains perhaps the best-known painting in the world. Art fans have long debated the symbolism of the subject\’s sly smile.

Rembrandt (1606-1669) Dutch Baroque artist whose hundreds of richly ornate paintings depict historical and biblical scenes. He also painted many portraits. One of his most famous is The Night Watch. Enormous in size, it shows a military company moving forward. His use of light draws the eye to the main figures in the painting.

Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890) Dutch Post-impressionist artist who painted nearly all of his most famous works over a period of 29 months, while suffering from mental illness. Many of his paintings reveal his emotional distress. Van Gogh painted Starry Night when he was in a French hospital. In the painting, probably his most famous, bright yellow stars and planets burst forth from the swirling night sky.

Louise Nevelson (1900-1988) American sculptor who created huge, abstract arrangements of stacked objects that were usually painted black, white or gold. She often used items that she found, including pieces of wood, broken mirrors and glass, metal and electric lights.

Salvador Dali (1904-1989) Spanish Surrealist artist known for his wild imagination. His paintings are eerily nightmarish and realistic. One of his most famous paintings, Persistence of Memory, features droopy watches that seem to be melting.

Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988) American painter who was a graffiti artist before being accepted into the art establishment as a rising star. He often incorporated graffiti and text into his paintings, which were powerful yet angry.

Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) American Abstract artist famous for his drip and pour style of painting. He dripped paint onto huge canvasses, creating complicated works with a splattered effect. In 2006, his painting titled No. 5 sold for $140 million, becoming the highest price ever paid for a painting.

Annie Liebovitz (b. 1949) American portrait photographer who often takes pictures of celebrities for magazines. She has earned celebrity status herself. At age 23 Liebovitz became chief photographer for Rolling Stone magazine, where she worked from 1973 to 1983. She remains the best-known photographer of her generation.

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Minerals and Gems

Kids Learning October 14, 2013

Minerals and Gems

Minerals are solid, inorganic (not living) substances that are found in and on earth. Most are chemical compounds, which means they are made up of two or more elements. For example, the mineral sapphire is made up of aluminum and oxygen. A few minerals, such as gold, silver and copper, are made from a single element. Minerals are considered the building blocks of rocks. Rocks can be a combination of as many as six minerals.

Many minerals, such as gold and silver, are very valuable because they are beautiful and rare. Limestone, clay and quartz are other examples of minerals.

Gems are minerals or pearls that have been cut and polished. They are used as ornaments, such as jewelry. Precious stones are the most valuable gems. They include diamonds, rubies and emeralds

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About Sun

Kids Learning October 14, 2013

It’s hard to imagine that the Sun has not always been the way it is today. Yet there was time, in the distant past, when the Sun did not exist.

More than 5 billion years ago, there was no Sun, no Earth, no solar system at all. There was, instead, just a huge, thin cloud of gas and dust slowly turning and drifting through space.

Gradually, the cloud became smaller. Because of its own gravity it pulled itself together. At the same time, it began to get hotter and denser.

By about 5 billion years ago, nearly all the cloud’s gas was packed into a big, fuzzy ball at the center of the cloud. Then a very important thing happened. Deep inside the ball, the temperature rose high enough for fusion to start. Hydrogen began to turn into helium, making light and heat. What had been a ball of gas became a star: the Sun.

But there was more to come. Not all of the gas had been used up in making the Sun. Some of it settled into a flat, pancake-shaped cloud that now circled the newborn star. Slowly, from this cloud, the planets, moons and other members of the Sun’s family formed.

What will happen to the Sun in the future? For billions of years, it will carry on “burning” hydrogen fuel in its core. Although the Sun uses up around 5 million tons of hydrogen every second, it still has enough left i its core to last for another 5 billion years or so.

When it finally does run out of fuel, though, something very odd will happen to the Sun. It will swell up to many times its present size and become what is known as a red giant.
In its old age, the Sun may shed a colorful nebula like this one
——————————————————————————–

The outer layers of the Sun will grow to swallow up, in turn, the planets Mercury and Venus. They may even reach out as far as Earth. Then, the surface of our planet will be scorched, and its oceans boiled dry.

As a red giant, the Sun might be able to exist for a few more million years. During this time it will shed matter quite quickly. The solar wind will strengthen to a solar gale. Finally, the Sun may cast off most of its outer layers as a bright shell of gas called a planetary nebula.

All that will be left behind is a very hot, dense core. The Sun, in fact, will have become a white dwarf – a star no bigger than the Earth. Gradually, over many millions of years, even this small star will cool. The Sun will end its days quietly as a dimming ember in space.

Before this happens, human beings may have learned how to travel to other stars. We may be able to make our home on a planet around a friendlier star. But perhaps we will leave behind a robot probe to watch the final fate of our old neighborhood star.

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